Celebrate Thanksgiving Day at the Museums!

Already planning your post-Turkey stroll to make room for seconds? Why not take that stroll while enjoying some art?

Little known fact: Smithsonian Institution museums and the National Gallery of Art are open on Thanksgiving.

Private museums such as The Phillips Collection, The Corcoran Gallery of Art and The Kreeger Museum are closed on Thanksgiving.

Go forth and enjoy turkey and fine art (but please, no drumsticks in the museum).

The absence of Doug Aitken’s Song 1 is creating a hole in my heart. Live jazz in the NGA Sculpture Garden won’t fill it, but at least it’s bringing together art and music in a way that we don’t get enough here.

Jazz in the Garden is every Friday from 5:00 to 8:30pm at the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden, now through Labor Day weekend.

manpodcast
Direct reblog from manpodcast:

Cory Arcangel, Video Painting, 2008. Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.
This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Cory Arcangel, who is included in “The Sports Show” at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Arcangel is best-known for his tweaks of video games and his media-based tricksterism. 
Unlike a lot of video art, this piece is unique. See stills and more at Arcangel’s website. And wait, what’s that you’re saying… that Video Painting looked different when I posted it yesterday? Yup, exactly.
Last year the Whitney Museum of American Art hosted a show of new Arcangel work titled “Cory Arcangel: Pro Tools.” His work is in the collection of many museums, including the Museum of Modern Art and the Albright-Knox Art Gallery.
For the show’s second segment, I check in with the artist who held office hours in a former museum director’s office during her show. Zoe Strauss, whose exhibition “Ten Years” just closed at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, explains how that unusual arrangement worked out. I wrote about my visit to her office here.
To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To download the program directly to your mobile device/PC, click here or click on the image. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. For images of the works discussed on this week’s show, click here.
Direct reblog from

manpodcast:

Cory Arcangel, Video Painting, 2008. Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features Cory Arcangel, who is included in “The Sports Show” at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Arcangel is best-known for his tweaks of video games and his media-based tricksterism.

Unlike a lot of video art, this piece is unique. See stills and more at Arcangel’s website. And wait, what’s that you’re saying… that Video Painting looked different when I posted it yesterday? Yup, exactly.

Last year the Whitney Museum of American Art hosted a show of new Arcangel work titled “Cory Arcangel: Pro Tools.” His work is in the collection of many museums, including the Museum of Modern Art and the Albright-Knox Art Gallery.

For the show’s second segment, I check in with the artist who held office hours in a former museum director’s office during her show. Zoe Strauss, whose exhibition “Ten Years” just closed at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, explains how that unusual arrangement worked out. I wrote about my visit to her office here.

To download or subscribe to The Modern Art Notes Podcast via iTunes, click here. To download the program directly to your mobile device/PC, click here or click on the image. To subscribe to The MAN Podcast’s RSS feed, click here. For images of the works discussed on this week’s show, click here.

The Luce Foundation’s Unplugged series continues this Sunday, February 12, at 1:30pm at the American Art Museum with DC band The Torches. Since Sunday is Lincoln’s actual birthday, the band chose the painting Life Mask by Patricia Roberts (which is actually Lincoln’s death mask) for the pre-show artist talk.

Given that it’s Black History Month, you may be asking yourself, hmm, whatever happened to the the National Museum of African American History and Culture? And the plan to build it on the National Mall? Wonder no more, details when you click above.

The Archives of American Art always seem to have hidden gem shows. Memories Arrested in Space, a centennial tribute to Jackson Pollock, may be yet another one.

Opening this Saturday, January 28th, the show is curated by Pollock expert Helen Harrison and contains ephemera from the lives of Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner.

Exhibit runs through May 15, 2012 in the Lawrence A. Fleischman Gallery, 1st Floor, Donald W. Reynolds Center, 8th and F St., NW.

Incredibly cool Archives of American Art exhibit:

"When an artist dies, his or her life’s work is complete, and the building of a legacy begins. The Archives of American Art is part of that legacy-building process, preserving the remnants of artists’ lives in letters, diaries, sketchbooks, scrapbooks, and other primary records. Among these documents are countless examples of people responding to death in the art world—from letters of condolence and drafts of eulogies, to firsthand accounts of artists’ funerals and expressions of personal loss. The death of an artist evokes powerful emotions in the living, even as it crystallizes the deceased’s contributions to the art world."

Included in this are a letter from Mark Rothko to Lee Krasner after the death of Jackson Pollock; a list of people to call after the death of Frederick Kiesler (incl. Frankenthaler, de Kooning and Motherwell); eulogy for painter Carl Holty by Romare Bearden; Arthur Dove’s essay on Alfred Steiglitz’s death and the list goes on.

Exhibit runs through December 31st at the Lawrence A. Fleischman Gallery.